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Graduate Admissions

Graduate training is very different from undergraduate courses. It is based on individual needs and abilities, and is designed to help you to think clearly, originally and practically, and to prepare you for leadership in science. We teach our graduate students how to plan and carry out cutting-edge research. Cambridge is an amazing place to learn how to do research. Visiting speakers and collaborators come from all over the world, and there are simply too many seminars for one person to attend! We have a careful system of monitoring the individual progress of each student; everyone has both a principal supervisor and associated advisor, and there are weekly student-led seminars.

Research training within the Department has several essential components, the first and foremost being the research project itself, to which you will make a significant contribution. This will give you experience and training in a variety of experimental and/or clinical research techniques, but will also teach you how to organise research, plan experiments, and read and digest the scientific literature relevant to your research work. Most research groups have weekly or fortnightly meetings in which all members discuss each others work.

However, other skills are also important. You will be required to attend seminars and round-tables, and you will have the opportunity to go to scientific meetings both in the UK and abroad. These bring you into direct contact with prominent and active scientists in your field from around the world.

You will also give scientific talks yourself. Audiences for such talks are often quite large, and the discussion of your paper is often very lively. You will also be expected to attend courses, either directly related to your research (for example, they might teach you a specific skill or expand your theoretical knowledge) or teach you general skills which are important for well-qualified scientist to know (for example, how to write a scientific paper, use databases, or interact with the media). There are a large number of these courses, and many of them are run by the the Graduate School of Life Sciences, but the Department has its own series of seminars and workshops and an annual Spring School, which is focused each year on a different topic.

We expect our graduate students to publish in high quality journals, and nearly all of them do so.

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Key Information


3-4 years full-time

5-7 years part-time

Doctor of Philosophy

Department of Clinical Neurosciences

Enquiries

Course on Department Website

Dates and deadlines:

Applications open
Dec. 1, 2015
Application deadline
Sept. 4, 2016
Course Starts
Jan. 5, 2017

All deadlines are 12:00pm UK time on the date stated. Some courses can close early. See the Deadlines page for guidance on when to apply.

Applications open
March 1, 2016
Application deadline
Dec. 15, 2016
Course Starts
April 17, 2017

All deadlines are 12:00pm UK time on the date stated. Some courses can close early. See the Deadlines page for guidance on when to apply.

Michaelmas 2017

Applications open
Sept. 5, 2016
Application deadline
May 31, 2017
Course Starts
Oct. 1, 2017

All deadlines are 12:00pm UK time on the date stated. Some courses can close early. See the Deadlines page for guidance on when to apply.

Applications open
Dec. 6, 2016
Application deadline
Sept. 4, 2017
Course Starts
Jan. 5, 2018

All deadlines are 12:00pm UK time on the date stated. Some courses can close early. See the Deadlines page for guidance on when to apply.

Applications open
March 17, 2017
Application deadline
Dec. 15, 2017
Course Starts
April 17, 2018

All deadlines are 12:00pm UK time on the date stated. Some courses can close early. See the Deadlines page for guidance on when to apply.

Gates Cambridge (USA)
Oct. 12, 2016
Gates Cambridge (EU)
Dec. 7, 2016
All Overseas
Dec. 7, 2016
All EU & Home (not Gates)
Jan. 4, 2017

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