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Graduate Admissions

2 courses offered in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology

The Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology has two broad areas of research activity. The first covers the use of large population databases to identify key predictive features associated with human pregnancy. Research is also focused on perinatal control of maternal and fetal smooth muscle contractility, clinical research interest in predicting pregnancy complications such as intra-uterine growth restriction, preterm labour and perinatal death.

The second major area focuses on the cellular and molecular aspects of the growth of the placenta and its interaction with the endometrium. This includes detailed investigation of the immune dialogue occurring between the fetal and maternal compartments. Genetic and epigenetic modulation of placental function is also a key area within this field. Modern genomic methods are utilised in both human and genetically manipulated animal models.

An additional aspect of this work focuses on the development of blood vessels in all tissues but focusing on those in the endometrium and placenta, in healthy tissue and in ectopic endometrium and cancer. This interdisciplinary work involves complex teams of molecular and cellular biologists, anatomists, mathematicians, bioinformaticians, statisticians and clinician-scientists.

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The Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology has two broad areas of research activity. The first covers the use of large population databases to identify key predictive features associated with human pregnancy. Research is also focused on perinatal control of maternal and fetal smooth muscle contractility, clinical research interest in predicting pregnancy complications such as intra-uterine growth restriction, preterm labour and perinatal death.

The second major area focuses on the cellular and molecular aspects of the growth of the placenta and its interaction with the endometrium. This includes detailed investigation of the immune dialogue occurring between the fetal and maternal compartments. Genetic and epigenetic modulation of placental function is also a key area within this field. Modern genomic methods are utilised in both human and genetically manipulated animal models.

An additional aspect of this work focuses on the development of blood vessels in all tissues but focusing on those in the endometrium and placenta, in healthy tissue and in ectopic endometrium and cancer. This interdisciplinary work involves complex teams of molecular and cellular biologists, anatomists, mathematicians, bioinformaticians, statisticians and clinician-scientists.

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4 courses also advertised in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology

From the Department of Medicine

The MD degree is a doctorate awarded to clinicians who undertake an extended period of scientific research. It provides an opportunity for doctors to receive recognition of research achievement within an approved academic programme.

The MD programme, on a par academically with the PhD, spans a maximum of six years, allowing candidates to undertake their research alongside clinical or other responsibilities, at the end of which their dissertation is examined by viva. Those candidates working in Cambridge will be assigned a University supervisor and become registered students of the University and members of a College. Those candidates intending to work at an institution outside Cambridge must already hold a Cambridge degree and must apply to take the MD by Special Regulations.

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From the Cambridge Institute for Medical Research

Taking advantage of the genomic revolution, this PhD programme allows students to move from the analysis of host and pathogen genetics, the identification of new genes and molecules, through immunogenomics, viral and bacterial pathogenesis, immune adaptation and evasion, complex genetic analysis of human disease to the macroscopic manifestation of infectious diseases in population dynamics and mathematical modelling.

By understanding the pathogen and how the immune system responds to that pathogen, together with the autoreactive potential of the immune response, we aim to improve our knowledge of the pathogenesis of both infectious and inflammatory disorders, as well as develop new treatment strategies to combat these conditions. While no student can be expert in all these areas, it is our premise that equipping the next generation of scientists with a rigorous training, skill set and broad academic insight will provide them with the expertise to bring novel and innovative approaches to the study of infection, immunity and inflammation.

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From the Department of Medicine

The Cambridge MRC Doctoral Training Programme  is a partnership between the University of Cambridge and the Babraham Institute. Included as associate partners are the MRC institutes and units in Cambridge, and other University Partner Institutes.

The Programme is offering at least ten fully funded PhD studentships for projects commencing in October 2019.

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From the Department of Medicine

This innovative programme was established in 2002 as a collaboration between the University of Cambridge and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the US. Its aim is to train outstanding students in biomedical research, taking advantage of the outstanding research environments. Students work on collaborative projects organised by co-supervisors at both Cambridge and the NIH, spending two years at each institution. Students have access to all NIH facilities and are paid by the NIH. The PhD is awarded by the University of Cambridge.

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Department Members


Professor G C S Smith
Head of Department

  • 5 Academic Staff
  • 12 Postdoctoral Researchers
  • 11 Graduate Students

http://www.obgyn.cam.ac.uk/