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Graduate Admissions

4 courses offered in the Department of Clinical Biochemistry

Students undertake a specific research project of three to four years' duration, and submit a dissertation which is examined for the PhD. In principle, the research project can be in any area of interest to principal investigators based in the Metabolic Research Laboratories at the Wellcome Trust-MRC Institute of Metabolic Science – view the Principal Investigators page on the Metabolic Research Laboratories website for details. Between them, groups encompass skills in genetics, cell biology, cell signalling, neuroendocrinology, bioenergetics, human and animal physiology, as well as experimental medicine and clinical trials. 

Students wishing to apply for a PhD in Clinical Biochemistry at the Cambridge Institute for Medical Research (CIMR), should investigate opportunities via the Study at CIMR page on the CIMR website.  

 

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It is essential that young clinicians with aptitude are able to receive high-quality research training in clinical science, representing as they do the future of academic medicine. We can offer training in an outstanding environment in subjects that span the research spectrum from basic science to epidemiology and public health.

We take great pride in our track record of successfully training clinicians to undertake the highest quality clinical research and the Schools of Clinical Medicine and Biological Sciences, together with the MRC, Wellcome Trust and Cancer Research UK institutes, offer one of the most rewarding institutes in which you could pursue your research training.

Programme investigators provide lectures, workshops and mini-projects in order to allow successful candidates to make an informed choice of PhD project and supervisor that are tailored to the interests of the candidate. This novel approach to the training of clinical scientists aims to provide the support and mentoring required to allow clinical academics to reach their full potential and pursue a successful academic career. We fully recognise that each individual will have a different background and current training position. Some will be academic clinical fellows whilst others will be on standard training programmes. Equally some individuals who are interested in epidemiology and public health or computational biology/bioinformatics may wish to undertake a taught MPhil to obtain sufficient knowledge to embark on their PhD. These can all be accommodated within the Cambridge scheme. All we ask is academic excellence, hard work and the will to make a difference to your chosen profession.

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The MRL considers applications for a one-year MPhil by research from both basic scientists and clinical trainees.

Students undertake a specific research project, typically of 12 months' duration, with a PI at the University of Cambridge Metabolic Research Laboratories (MRL) and submit a dissertation which is examined for the MPhil in Medical Sciences. 

Before making a formal application, applicants should contact individual investigators whose work interests them to discuss potential projects and availability of funding.

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This Wellcome Trust four-year PhD programme has a 1+3 structure. Students are introduced to several different research topics and environments in year 1 (for which an MRes is awarded), leading to a collaborative, interdisciplinary project in years 2–4 (for which the PhD is awarded). In the first year students select three 11-week mini-projects from different laboratories, and attend seminars and discussion groups given by group leaders who provide training in a broad range of scientific disciplines and techniques. Towards the end of the first year students select a specific three-year PhD project and prepare a detailed research proposal before commencing the project itself.

The programme covers two disease areas (metabolic and cardiovascular) and diverse experimental approaches (molecular and cell biology, physiology in model organisms, human physiology, human genetics, population and nutritional sciences), creating a matrix of training opportunities. A fundamental aim of the programme is to ensure all students gain significant knowledge and awareness of the potential power of all of the experimental approaches in both diseases.

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5 courses also advertised in the Department of Clinical Biochemistry

From the Department of Medicine

The MD degree is a doctorate awarded to clinicians who undertake an extended period of scientific research. It provides an opportunity for doctors to receive recognition of research achievement within an approved academic programme.

The MD programme, on a par academically with the PhD, spans a maximum of six years, allowing candidates to undertake their research alongside clinical or other responsibilities, at the end of which their dissertation is examined by viva. Those candidates working in Cambridge will be assigned a University supervisor and become registered students of the University and members of a College. Those candidates intending to work at an institution outside Cambridge must already hold a Cambridge degree and must apply to take the MD by Special Regulations.

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From the Cambridge Institute for Medical Research

The Cambridge Institute for Medical Research (CIMR) is one of the leading research institutions in the UK and provides a unique interface between clinical and basic biomedical science. Its major goal is to determine and understand the molecular mechanisms underlying human disease. The strength of the institute is that members work on a variety of diseases using a wide range of methodologies which makes it a superb place for graduate training in biological and medical sciences. CIMR has around 26 group leaders working in a range of disease mechanisms, ranging from neurodegenerative disease, haematological disorders, immunological and infectious diseases to cancer.

Research in CIMR is focused on fundamental cell biological processes, with particular emphasis on membrane trafficking, organelle function, protein homeostasis and folding, the cytoskeleton and autophagy.

The Cambridge Institute offers a one-year full-time MPhil programme of research under individual supervision of principal investigators based in CIMR. This course can also be taken as part-time option over two years. During their MPhil the students are based in a research group, supported by their primary supervisor and the CIMR Graduate Education Committee. There is no taught and examined course work, but students are encouraged to attend research seminars at the Addenbrooke's Biomedical Research Campus and elsewhere in the University, and graduate student seminars dealing with generic skills such as intellectual property rights, writing a thesis or paper, and entrepreneurship. Students write a dissertation, which is examined via an oral examination.

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From the Cambridge Institute for Medical Research

The Cambridge Institute for Medical Research (CIMR) is one of the leading research institutions in the UK and provides a unique interface between clinical and basic biomedical science. Its major goal is to determine and understand the molecular mechanisms underlying human disease. The strength of the institute is that members work on a variety of diseases using a wide range of methodologies, which makes it a superb place for graduate training in biological and medical sciences. CIMR has  around 26 group leaders working in a range of disease mechanisms, ranging from neurodegenerative disease, haematological disorders, immunological and infectious diseases to cancer.

Research in CIMR is focused on fundamental cell biological processes, with particular emphasis on membrane trafficking, organelle function, protein homeostasis and folding, the cytoskeleton and autophagy.

The Cambridge Institute offers a three-year full-time PhD programme of research under individual supervision of principal investigators based in CIMR. This course can also be taken as part-time option over six years. The PhD students are based in a research group, supported by their primary and secondary supervisor and the CIMR Graduate Education Committee. There is no taught and examined course work, but students can take part in core topic discussion sessions held once a week by PIs in CIMR.

Along with the specific research training provided in the laboratory in which the student works, he or she receives further training within the CIMR in the form of graduate workshops concentrating on research techniques, research seminars both on the Addenbrooke's site and elsewhere in the University, and graduate student seminars dealing with generic skills such as intellectual property rights, writing a thesis or paper, and entrepreneurship. Students write a dissertation, which is examined via an oral examination.

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From the Department of Medicine

The Cambridge MRC Doctoral Training Programme  is a partnership between the University of Cambridge and the Babraham Institute. Included as associate partners are the MRC institutes and units in Cambridge, and other University Partner Institutes.

The Programme is offering at least ten fully funded PhD studentships for projects commencing in October 2019.

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From the Department of Medicine

This innovative programme was established in 2002 as a collaboration between the University of Cambridge and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the US. Its aim is to train outstanding students in biomedical research, taking advantage of the outstanding research environments. Students work on collaborative projects organised by co-supervisors at both Cambridge and the NIH, spending two years at each institution. Students have access to all NIH facilities and are paid by the NIH. The PhD is awarded by the University of Cambridge.

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Department Members


Professor Stephen O'Rahilly
Head of Department

  • 25 Academic Staff
  • 50 Postdoctoral Researchers
  • 50 Graduate Students

http://www.clbc.cam.ac.uk/

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