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Graduate Admissions

2 courses offered in the Department of Genetics

Modern genetics research seeks to provide a systems-level understanding of biology by relating genome sequence to function and phenotype. Research in the Department of Genetics covers a wide spectrum of biological problems, united by the application of genetics tools and approaches. Research themes range from the analysis of basic mechanisms in cell biology relating to the mechanics of division, migration and communication, through the large-scale analysis of genome regulation and epigenetic control, to aspects of population biology focused on issues of ecological and evolutionary significance.

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Modern genetics research seeks to provide a systems-level understanding of biology by relating genome sequence to function and phenotype. The research in the Department of Genetics covers a wide spectrum of biological problems, united by the application of genetics tools and approaches. Research themes range from understanding basic mechanisms in cell biology relating to the mechanics of division, migration and communication, through the large-scale analysis of genome regulation and epigenetic control, to aspects of population biology focused on issues of ecological and evolutionary significance.

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3 courses also advertised in the Department of Genetics

From the Department of Plant Sciences

This four-year programme provides excellent postgraduate training, addressing the need for trained scientists in strategically important research areas and skills. The DTP programme has four separate research themes addressing the strategic research priorities of BBSRC:

The research topics included in the Cambridge DTP are aimed at improving understanding of basic biological mechanisms, from the study of biological molecules, to cellular and physiological processes, including genetic and genomic approaches. There is an emphasis on multidisciplinary research interfacing with physical sciences and engineering. Biologists learn mathematical and computational methodologies to address biological questions and the programme may interest mathematicians interested in applying their knowledge to biological problems. A major goal of our training programme is to allow the flow of ideas, skills and key capabilities to provide mutual benefit in supporting the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries in the UK.

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From the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience

Developmental biology is a remarkably cross-disciplinary area of biomedical research that spans traditional departmental boundaries and many different technologies, such as molecular biology, genetics, cell biology, imaging and bioinformatics. This field is increasingly significant in the era of readily available genome sequences, because functional studies of development are essential to decipher the roles of many genes, and will be invaluable if we are to reap the benefits of this wealth of new information. A major challenge now is to find more powerful, systematic and quantitative ways of investigating how this genetic information is translated into morphogenetic instructions, and to analyse how these instructions generate and are modulated by the forces that shape tissues and organs. Our PhD programme embraces this challenge and offers a powerful opportunity to explore the mechanisms underlying key developmental processes.

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From the Department of Medicine

The Cambridge MRC Doctoral Training Programme  is a partnership between the University of Cambridge and the Babraham Institute. Included as associate partners are the MRC institutes and units in Cambridge, and other University Partner Institutes.

The Programme is offering at least ten fully funded PhD studentships for projects commencing in October 2019.

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Department Members


Professor Anne Ferguson-Smith
Head of Department

  • 22 Academic Staff
  • 52 Postdoctoral Researchers
  • 48 Graduate Students
  • 31 Undergraduates

http://www.gen.cam.ac.uk/

Research Areas